Tone vs. Mood

 

TONE and MOOD are two different concepts in literature.

 

¥ TONE describes the authorÕs attitude toward his/her subject.

The attitude may be stated in so many words or implied.  Diction is a key to tone.  Tones can be (among other things):

 


affectionate

aggravated

aloof

amused

angry

apathetic

appreciative

approving

arrogant

bitter

calm

celebratory

condescending

contemplative

critical

cynical

dark

dejected

depressed

desperate

despondent

didactic

disappointed

disapproving

disgusted

disinterested

distant

droll

earnest

ecstatic

emphatic

encouraging

enthusiastic

excited

facetious

formal

happy

haughty

hurt

informal

intense

ironic

joyful

lackadaisical

languid

light-hearted

melancholy

melodramatic

nervous

neutral

nonchalant

optimistic

paranoid

passive

patronizing

pessimistic

plaintive

playful

pleading

proud

romantic

sad

sarcastic

scornful

serious

sincere

somber

soothing

superficial

suspicious

sympathetic

uninterested

whimsical

wistful

wry


 


Mood music

Mood music

Mood music

Mood music

 
¥ MOOD is the situation's atmosphere or characters' feelings:

 


Calm

Cheerful

Chilling

Comical

Dark

Depressing

Dismal

Eerie

Fanciful

Foreboding

Gloomy

Grim

Grotesque

Heart-breaking

Heartrending

Holy

Hopeful

Horrific

Intense

Joyful

Light

Lighthearted

Melancholic

Morbid

Mournful

Mysterious

Ominous

Optimistic

Pessimistic

Powerful

Romantic

Sad

Sinister

Soothing

Sorrowful

Spiritual

Spooky

Terrifying

Threatening

Tranquil

Whimsical

 

 

 

 


 

"Charlie surveyed the classroom of dolts, congratulating himself for snatching the higher test grade, the smug smirk on his face growing brighter and brighter as he confirmed the inferiority of his peers."

The character Charlie's MOOD is: gleeful superiority

The author's TONE is: exaggerated, somewhat cynical

 

(Source unknown; please contact this site if you can help identify!)